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“Do pharmacies in Boston sell Plan B over the counter? Asking for a friend…” #TuftsCARE #PlanB #vagweek

Posted by Tufts CARE on Friday, March 3, 2017

Emergency Contraception

Emergency Contraception is available whenever Health Service is open. If you have questions about EC when Health Service is closed, call them at 617-627-3350. For more information about EC methods, click here

You can use emergency contraception to prevent pregnancy if:

  • you didn’t use a condom or other birth control method when you had vaginal sex
  • you messed up your regular birth control (forgot to take your birth control pills, change your patch or ring, or get your shot on time) and had vaginal sex
  • your condom broke or slipped off after ejaculation (cumming)
  • your partner didn't pull out in time
  • you were forced to have unprotected vaginal sex

If you use emergency contraception correctly after you have unprotected sex, it makes it much less likely that you’ll get pregnant. But don’t use it regularly as your only protection from pregnancy, because it’s not as effective as regular, non-emergency birth control methods (like the IUD, pill, or condoms).

Types of Birth Control

Nuvaring (vaginal contraceptive ring)

What is it? 

The birth control ring (AKA NuvaRing) is a safe, simple, and affordable birth control method that you wear inside your vagina. The small, flexible ring prevents pregnancy by releasing hormones into your body.

The ring stays in for three weeks. If it slides out during that time, just rinse it off in cool water and put it back in. After three weeks, take it out and throw it away (in its original packaging). Then have 7 days ring free. You will have your period during that time. At the end of the 7 ring free days, put a new ring in (even if you are still spotting).

Things to note: The ring does not prevent against STIs. 

 

Birth Control Pill
What is it? Birth control pills are a kind of medicine with hormones that you take every day to prevent pregnancy. There are many different brands of pills. The pill is safe, affordable, and effective if you always take it on time. Besides preventing pregnancy, the pill has lots of other health benefits, too. Things to note: The pill does not protect against STIs (sexually transmitted infections).
Birth control implant *
What is it? The birth control implant (AKA Nexplanon) is a tiny, thin rod about the size of a matchstick. The implant releases hormones into your body that prevent you from getting pregnant. A nurse or doctor inserts the implant into your arm and that’s it — you’re protected from pregnancy for up to 4 years. It’s get-it-and-forget-it birth control. Things to note: This does not protect against STIs (sexually transmitted infections). This cannot be inserted on site at Health Services, so the clinicians will work with you to find a local provider to do this. * Health Services can consult on these methods of birth control but cannot perform the insertions onsite. If you choose this method of birth control, your clinician will work with you to find a local provider for this.
Birth control shot
What is it? The Depo shot (AKA Depo-Provera) is an injection you get from a nurse or doctor once every 3 months. It’s a safe, convenient, and private birth control method that works really well if you always get it on time. Things to note: This does not protect against STIs (sexually transmitted infections).
Condoms

What is it?

There are two types of condoms- the traditional condom (which is directly put on the penis before sex) or the universal condom also known as the female condom (is inserted into the vagina or anus, then the penis goes into the condom). 

 Condoms provide great protection from both pregnancy and STDs. They’re easy to use and easy to get.

Things to note: Condoms also prevent STDs by covering the penis, which prevents contact with semen and vaginal fluids, and limits skin-to-skin contact that can spread sexually transmitted infections. Lambskin condoms do not protect against STDs. Only latex and plastic condoms do.
Tufts provides free condoms that you can pick up from the Health Services. The CARE office also has Jumbo Condom Circus, a free condom delivery services that will deliver a package to your on campus residence hall.

IUD (Intrauterine device) *

An IUD is a tiny device that’s inserted in your uterus to prevent pregnancy. It’s long-term, reversible, and one of the most effective birth control methods out there. There are 5 different brands of IUDs that are FDA approved for use in the United States: ParaGard, Mirena, Kyleena, Skyla, and Liletta. These IUDs are divided into 2 types: copper IUDs (ParaGard) and hormonal IUDs (Mirena, Kyleena, Skyla, and Liletta).

Things to note: This does not protect against STIs (sexually transmitted infections).

*  Health Services can consult on these methods of birth control but cannot perform the insertions onsite. If you choose this method of birth control, your clinician will work with you to find a local provider for this.